Climate change will grab globe’s focus with summit, strikes

Climate change will grab globe’s focus with summit, strikes
Climate change will grab globe’s focus with summit, strikes

Get ready to hear about global warming — or the “climate emergency ” as the United Nations is calling it.

In the next week, there will be climate strikes, climate summits, climate debates, a dire climate science report, climate pledges by countries and businesses, promises of climate financial help and more between now and next Friday. There will even be a bit of climate poetry, film and music.

Much of it is being spurred by the world’s youth.

“We’re about to start an extraordinary series of events over the next few days,” said Rachel Kyte, special representative on sustainable energy for the United Nations secretary-general. “The climate emergency is being declared by people, and especially young people on the streets the world over. And this is about an appropriate response to that emergency.”

The centerpiece is the U.N. climate summit, called by Secretary-General Antonio Guterres. The U.N. chief said he will be pressuring countries to promise to reduce carbon pollution even more than they did in the landmark 2015 Paris climate agreement. These next steps weren’t due until 2020, but Guterres wants them earlier and he wants them to be harsher. Essentially, he’s hoping that by midcentury the world will be adding no more heat-trapping gases to Earth’s atmosphere.

Hundreds of businesses, cities, states and organizations will also be at the meeting to pledge their own pollution cuts and offer financial help to poorer nations trying to shift from fossil fuels to cleaner energy sources. He said the idea is to come out of the summit, not with all problems solved “but with enhanced momentum.”

John Reilly, an MIT economist who has been working on global warming issues for about 40 years, says he’s never seen a busier or more important time.

“This is a new milestone in trying to move ahead on climate change because we have both attention of international organizations and governments and activism by people,” Reilly said.

This burst of events comes as scientists say the world’s climate is getting even wilder, hotter and more dangerous.

“We are seeing more impacts of climate disruption, because we are pushing the climate further and further from its natural state,” said Stanford University environmental sciences chief Chris Field.

After a two-day presidential candidates’ forum Thursday and Friday, the action really gets heated.

 

Activists on Friday were launching a series of climate strikes, with thousands of youths walking out of class in the United States and around the globe. And they plan to strike again on Sept. 27.Get ready to hear about global warming — or the “climate emergency ” as the United Nations is calling it.

In the next week, there will be climate strikes, climate summits, climate debates, a dire climate science report, climate pledges by countries and businesses, promises of climate financial help and more between now and next Friday. There will even be a bit of climate poetry, film and music.

Much of it is being spurred by the world’s youth.

“We’re about to start an extraordinary series of events over the next few days,” said Rachel Kyte, special representative on sustainable energy for the United Nations secretary-general. “The climate emergency is being declared by people, and especially young people on the streets the world over. And this is about an appropriate response to that emergency.”

The centerpiece is the U.N. climate summit, called by Secretary-General Antonio Guterres. The U.N. chief said he will be pressuring countries to promise to reduce carbon pollution even more than they did in the landmark 2015 Paris climate agreement. These next steps weren’t due until 2020, but Guterres wants them earlier and he wants them to be harsher. Essentially, he’s hoping that by midcentury the world will be adding no more heat-trapping gases to Earth’s atmosphere.

Hundreds of businesses, cities, states and organizations will also be at the meeting to pledge their own pollution cuts and offer financial help to poorer nations trying to shift from fossil fuels to cleaner energy sources. He said the idea is to come out of the summit, not with all problems solved “but with enhanced momentum.”

John Reilly, an MIT economist who has been working on global warming issues for about 40 years, says he’s never seen a busier or more important time.

“This is a new milestone in trying to move ahead on climate change because we have both attention of international organizations and governments and activism by people,” Reilly said.

This burst of events comes as scientists say the world’s climate is getting even wilder, hotter and more dangerous.

“We are seeing more impacts of climate disruption, because we are pushing the climate further and further from its natural state,” said Stanford University environmental sciences chief Chris Field.

After a two-day presidential candidates’ forum Thursday and Friday, the action really gets heated.

Activists on Friday were launching a series of climate strikes, with thousands of youths walking out of class in the United States and around the globe. And they plan to strike again on Sept. 27.

ID: 50019447

Published on: Friday, September 20, 2019 07:30 PM

Source: https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/climate-change-grab-globes-focus-summit-strikes-65746451

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